The Foundation Programme
General FAQ's

provisionally-registered/01 General


  1. Who is eligible to apply for the Foundation Programme?
  2. Who can act as referees for Foundation Programme applicants?
  3. What if there are not enough applicants for all the vacancies available?
  4. What is the role of the UKFPO?
  5. Where can I find out more about the Foundation Programme?
  6. What should I do if I'm asked to perform procedures which are inappropriate or beyond my competence?
  7. What salary can I expect as a foundation doctor?
  8. Can I change foundation schools once I've started the programme?
  9. Is it possible to undertake foundation training less than full-time?
  10. What happens if I'm ill during my training?
  11. What happens if I want to take time out during the Foundation Programme?
  12. Can I complete the Foundation Programme in less than two years?
  13. What happens if I require support during my foundation training?
  14. What assessments are used during foundation training?
  15. What is a supervised learning event (SLE)?
  16. Can I use study leave to prepare for specialty exams?
  17. What formal teaching do I get during foundation training?
  18. Who is responsible for delivering/overseeing the programme?
  19. What are postgraduate deaneries?
  20. What are foundation schools?
  21. How do I apply for less than full-time training?
  22. If I have any pending investigations into my fitness to practise, is there any action I need to take?
  23. What is the Malta Foundation School?
  24. What is the 2016 start date for F2s?
  25. What is the Foundation Programme?

provisionally-registered/02 F1


  1. What can I expect from my first year of foundation training (F1)?
  2. Can I do my F1 year abroad?
  3. Do I need to attend an induction or shadowing period at the start of my programme?
  4. Is there any information I should disclose before starting the Foundation Programme?

provisionally-registered/03 F2


  1. Can I apply for an F2 programme if I have not done an F1 year?
  2. Is F2 structured differently to F1?
  3. How are placements allocated in my F2 year?
  4. Am I allowed to undertake F2 abroad?

provisionally-registered/04 Application Process


  1. How do I apply to the Foundation Programme?
  2. Where can I find more information about the national application process?
  3. What is a unit of application (UoA)?
  4. How is my application scored?
  5. What is the Educational Performance Measure?
  6. The decile score I can see when I log in to my Oriel account is different to the one my medical school gave me. What should I do?
  7. What is the SJT (selection assessment for FP 2017)?
  8. When will I have to take the SJT (selection assessment for FP 2017)
  9. Why is the SJT scored on a scale of 0-50 whilst the EPM is only 34-50?
  10. How can one 2 hour 20 minutes exam be worth the same numberof points as 5/6 years at medical school?
  11. How do you know the SJT is a valid test (i.e. measures the attributes it is supposed to)?
  12. Can I link my application to another applicant?
  13. If I have a criminal conviction (which I must declare on my application form), what do I do?
  14. How do UoA preferences work when it comes to allocating FP applicants to places?
  15. What happens if there are not enough applicants for the number of vacancies available?
  16. What happens if there are not enough foundation training jobs for everyone who applies?
  17. Is it possible for me to be allocated to my first choice unit of application (UoA) if I?m on the reserve list?
  18. What happens if not enough vacancies arise for all applicants on the reserve list?
  19. Can I appeal against the outcome of my application?
  20. What happens if I do not wish to accept the post?
  21. I?ve been allocated to a foundation programme which was not my first choice. Can I continue working in this programme whilst re-applying for next year?
  22. Due to a change in my circumstances, I may not be able to take up my post in my allocated foundation school. What can I do?
  23. What is the process for providing references for the Foundation Programme?
  24. How do I know if a reference has been submitted?
  25. What if my referee does not provide a reference by the deadline?
  26. Can I change my referees?
  27. Can an ST3 act as my referee?
  28. What is the difference between date of qualification and date of graduation?
  29. What happens if I do not pass my final exams and graduate as expected?
  30. I applied last year but my application was withdrawn. Do I have to sit the SJT again?
  31. My GMC number on my application is wrong. How can I amend it?
  32. How do I apply for an F2 post?
  33. Can I apply to specialty training?
  34. I applied last year but withdrew my application. I want to re-apply for FP 2017 ? will my log in details be the same?

provisionally-registered/01 General


  1. Who is eligible to apply for the Foundation Programme?

    The eligibility criteria will be available on the How to Apply page of the UKFPO website.

    Back to questions

  2. Who can act as referees for Foundation Programme applicants?

    Applicants must choose two referees. One must be a hospital consultant, GP or associate specialist who can give an opinion on the applicant's clinical skills; the other must be from the applicant's medical school.

    Back to questions

  3. What if there are not enough applicants for all the vacancies available?

    If there are more applicants than vacancies, allocation to a foundation school becomes a three stage process:

    1. The top 'n' scoring applicants will be placed on the primary list, where 'n' is the total number of vacancies available across the UK.
    2. These applicants will be allocated to a foundation school in score order.
    3. The remaining applicants are placed on a reserve list, to be allocated in batches on predetermined dates.

    Here's an example. Please note that the numbers in this example are purely for illustrative purposes and are not the actual numbers.

    If there are 7,500 applicants for 7,000 places, the applicants would be first ranked in score order, and the top 7,000 applicants would be placed on the primary list. Primary list applicants will then be allocated in score order, starting with the highest scoring applicant. Applicants on the reserve list will be allocated as vacancies arise, in batches on pre-set dates. If one of the pre-set allocation dates is 29 March for example, and there are 150 applicants who were allocated on the primary list who have withdrawn, the top 150 applicants on the reserve list will be put into that batch to be allocated. They will be matched in score order. This process will be repeated for each successive batch until all applicants have been allocated.

    Back to questions

  4. What is the role of the UKFPO?

    The UKFPO manages the national application process to the Foundation Programme, issues guidance on foundation training and promotes the consistent delivery of the Foundation Programme across the UK. Working with partners, the UKFPO enables the sharing of good practice to help raise the standards of training. It is funded by and is accountable to the four UK health departments.

    Back to questions

  5. Where can I find out more about the Foundation Programme?

    The UKFPO website provides a wealth of information and resources to help you understand the Foundation Programme. As an introduction, the 2012 Foundation Programme Rough Guide provides a comprehensive overview of what you can expect. Please note this is currently being updated for 2013.

    It is also a good idea to read the FP Curriculum (2012) and associated Resource (a list of freely available resources to help meet the Currciulum outcomes), and the FP Reference Guide (2012). These resources will help you understand what is expected of you, how the assessments and supervised learning events (SLEs) work, and the requirements for satisfactory completion of F1 and the Foundation Programme.

    Back to questions

  6. What should I do if I'm asked to perform procedures which are inappropriate or beyond my competence?

    Patient safety is of paramount importance and you should only undertake tasks in which you are competent or are learning under supervision. Foundation doctors must not be put in a position where they are asked to work beyond their competence without appropriate support and supervision from their clinical supervisor e.g. the prescription or transcription of cytotoxic or
    immunosuppressive drugs.

    Foundation schools should make foundation doctors aware of and publish on their websites how foundation doctors can raise concerns if they believe that there is not an appropriate balance between service and training.

    Back to questions

  7. What salary can I expect as a foundation doctor?

    The Foundation Programme is a paid training programme. Please go to the NHS Employers website for more information on salary and benefits.

    Back to questions

  8. Can I change foundation schools once I've started the programme?

    There are two ways in which foundation doctors can change from one foundation school to another:

    • Inter-foundation school transfers
    • Competitive application process.

    For further information see the Reference Guide 2016 (Para. 6.111 to 6.117).

    Back to questions

  9. Is it possible to undertake foundation training less than full-time?

    Less than full-time working is available for the Foundation Programme*. The main reasons include:

    • a disability, which means the doctor needs individual arrangements
    • ill health
    • responsibility for caring for children
    • responsibility for caring for ill/disabled partner, relative or other dependant.

    Deaneries and foundation schools should make it clear how foundation doctors may access less than full-time training.


    *Please note that Tier 4 sponsored doctors are NOT permitted to work less than full-time; this is a condition of the UK Border Agency visa.

    Back to questions

  10. What happens if I'm ill during my training?

    Foundation doctors should be aware of the employer’s sickness absence policy, including their responsibilities for informing the employer of illness and cover arrangements during absences. The maximum permitted absence from training, other than annual leave, during the F1 year is 20 days where they were rotered to work (see GMC guidance on sick leave for provisionally registered doctors).

    Back to questions

  11. What happens if I want to take time out during the Foundation Programme?

    Foundation doctors may ask to take time out of their two-year foundation programme for a number of reasons, including:

    • gaining clinical experience outside of the Foundation Programme
    • undertaking a period of research
    • a planned career break.

    Foundation doctors who want to take time out of the Foundation Programme (TOFP) should first discuss this with their educational supervisor. The duration of TOFP is usually 12 months and taken between the end of F1 and the beginning of F2.

    For full details please see the Reference Guide 2012 (para 7.79-7.91).

    Back to questions

  12. Can I complete the Foundation Programme in less than two years?

    The Reference Guide 2012 explains the satisfactory requirements for completion of F1/the Foundation Programme. Completion of 12 months in F1 and F2 training is specified.

    Back to questions

  13. What happens if I require support during my foundation training?

    If you require additional support during your foundation training you should discuss these with your  foundation school as soon as possible. 

    Back to questions

  14. What assessments are used during foundation training?

    The assessment tools used during foundation training can be found below:

    Assessments Frequency
    E-portfolio Contemporaneously
    Core procedures Throughout F1
    Team assessment of behaviour (TAB) Once in first placement, optional repetition
    Clinical supervisor end of placement report Once per placement
    Educational supervisor end of placement report Once per placement
    Educational supervisor's end of year report Once per year

    Back to questions

  15. What is a supervised learning event (SLE)?

    There are supervised learning event tools to help you demonstrate engagement with the learning process and to gain valuable feedback to encourage development.

    Supervised learning event Recommended minimum number

    Direct observation of patient/doctor interaction:

    Mini-CEX

    DOPS

    3 or more per placement*

    (minimum of nine observations per year; at least six must be mini-CEX)

    Case-based discussion (CbD) Two or more per placement*
    Developing the clinical teacher One or more per year

    *based on a clinical placement of four month duration

    Back to questions

  16. Can I use study leave to prepare for specialty exams?

    Study leave should not be used to prepare for specialty examinations during foundation training but may be used to take a specialty examination.

    Back to questions

  17. What formal teaching do I get during foundation training?

    F1 doctors are entitled to three hours of in-house, formal education as part of their working week which should be relevant, protected (‘bleep-free’) and appropriate to their F1 training. Foundation doctors must be released to attend and should give their pagers to someone else so that they can take part.

    F2 doctors may receive three hours of in-house, formal education as part of their working week which should be relevant, protected (‘bleep-free’) and appropriate to their F2 training.

    Back to questions

  18. Who is responsible for delivering/overseeing the programme?

    The General Medical Council (GMC) is responsible for setting the standard required of foundation training, quality assurance against the standards and approval of training programmes. Postgraduate deaneries and LETB's are responsible for delivery and quality management of foundation programmes, which they manage through foundation schools.

    The national coordinating body for the Foundation Programme is the UK Foundation Programme Office (UKFPO), which has been commissioned by Health Education England (HEE) and the four UK health departments.

    You can read more about the role of the UKFPO by clicking here .

    Back to questions

  19. What are postgraduate deaneries?

    In England, from 1st April 2013, postgraduate deaneries became part of the newly formed Local Education Training Boards (LETBs). There are 13 LETBs across England.

    Wales and Northern Ireland still have a postgraduate deanery, and Scotland has four, each headed by a postgraduate dean.

    The deaneries/LETBs have responsibility for ensuring that the Foundation Programme is delivered to national standards set by the GMC. They are responsible for ensuring there is an effective educational infrastructure for foundation training through the foundation schools.

    Back to questions

  20. What are foundation schools?

    Foundation schools bring together local education providers (e.g. hospitals, GP practices, hospices) to offer foundation doctors training in a range of clinical settings so that they can attain all the outcomes required in the Curriculum. The schools are administered by a local staff which is supported by the deanery.

    In particular, foundation schools are responsible for ensuring the Foundation Programme is managed operationally in line with the FP Reference Guide 2016

    Back to questions

  21. How do I apply for less than full-time training?

    Applicants needing to train less than full-time as a foundation doctor (for reasons such as caring for a child or ill health) must compete with all other applicants for entry into the Foundation Programme. If successful, applicants should contact their allocated foundation school to discuss their training needs and how to access less than full-time training opportunities. Foundation schools should publish their process for less than full-time training on their website.

    Back to questions

  22. If I have any pending investigations into my fitness to practise, is there any action I need to take?

    You must contact the GMC as soon as possible to discuss the investigation with them. As with investigating criminal convictions, this may take some time, so it is advisable to do this sooner rather than later so that your employment contract is not held up.

    Back to questions

  23. What is the Malta Foundation School?

    By special agreement between the Department of Health (England) and the Health Care Services Division of the Maltese Ministry for Social Policy, the UKFPO provided technical support to establish a foundation training programme in Malta in July 2009. The UK recognises the Malta Foundation Programme as an affiliated programme as its curriculum, operational processes and quality assurance are based on those used in the UK. However, the Malta Foundation Programme is regulated by the Medical Council of Malta and not by the UK General Medical Council.

    A UK graduate who wishes to apply to the Malta Foundation Programme should seek the advice of their medical school. Under exceptional circumstances, the medical school in partnership with the local postgraduate deanery may prospectively approve training as a provisionally registered doctor outside the UK and, upon satisfactory completion, support their application for full registration with the GMC. If prospective approval is not given to a UK medical graduate, an application for full GMC registration will not be possible.

    The Malta Foundation School has its own recruitment process and does not participate in the national application process for the UK Foundation Programme managed by the UKFPO.

    Any doctor who successfully completes the Malta Foundation Programme will be awarded a Malta Foundation Achievement of Competence Document (FACD) which is accepted as equivalence of the UK FACD by specialty training recruitment bodies in the UK.

    More details are available from the Malta Foundation School website.

    Back to questions

  24. What is the 2016 start date for F2s?

    The 2016 start date for F2s is Wednesday 3 August 2016.

    Back to questions

  25. What is the Foundation Programme?

    The UK Foundation Programme is an integrated two-year training programme for newly qualified doctors who are eligible for provisional registration with the GMC in the UK.

    The programme was launched in August 2005 and follows a standard curriculum; the most recent edition is the FP Curriculum 2016. The FP Curriculum 2016 identifies the required outcomes for successful completion of each year of the programme and describes the assessments that foundation doctors are required to undertake.

    On successful completion of the first year of the programme, documented through an Annual Review of Competence Progression (ARCP) and subject to completion of a Certificate of Experience, doctors are eligible to apply for full GMC registration. Please refer to the GMC website for more information on the Certificate of Experience.

    Back to questions

provisionally-registered/02 F1


  1. What can I expect from my first year of foundation training (F1)?

    In most cases, you will undertake three four-month placements in different specialties. Formal assessment of your progress will be made at the end of each placement, and at the end of F1 (and F2).

    Assessments will be based on multiple sources of evidence including feedback from senior doctors who have observed practice in the workplace (Placement Supervision Group). Other important evidence will be provided through the e-portfolio including team assessments of behaviour (TAB), engagement with SLEs, reflective practice throughout the placement and satisfactory demonstration of the core procedural skills required by the GMC.

    At the end of F1, your performance and development throughout the year will be reviewed and (if satisfactory) will lead to recommendation to the GMC that you satisfy the requirements for full registration and progression into F2.

    Back to questions

  2. Can I do my F1 year abroad?

    To ensure that all new appointees to the Foundation Programme are equipped with the local knowledge and skills needed to provide safe, high quality patient care from their first day as a F1 doctor, they should normally undertake a “shadowing” period. This should include ward-based shadowing of the F1 job that they will be taking up and corporate induction.

    In addition to shadowing, there are three levels of inductions which may be offered:

    • Deanery/foundation school;
    • Employer/local education provider (LEP); and
    • Departmental/workplace.

    Back to questions

  3. Do I need to attend an induction or shadowing period at the start of my programme?

    To ensure that all new appointees to the Foundation Programme are equipped with the local knowledge and skills needed to provide safe, high quality patient care from their first day as a F1 doctor, they should normally undertake a “shadowing” period. This should include ward-based shadowing of the F1 job that they will be taking up and corporate induction.

    In addition to shadowing, there are three levels of inductions which may be offered:

    • Deanery/foundation school;
    • Employer/local education provider (LEP); and
    • Departmental/workplace.

    Back to questions

  4. Is there any information I should disclose before starting the Foundation Programme?

    Every foundation trainee must complete a transfer of information (TOI) form as part of the TOI process. This is a means of supporting medical students during the transition from medical school to foundation school, and during the F1 year.

    For more information on the TOI process go to the TOI page.

    Back to questions

provisionally-registered/03 F2


  1. Can I apply for an F2 programme if I have not done an F1 year?

    Yes. You can apply for a stand-alone F2 programme as long as you are eligible for full registration with the GMC. F2 posts are recruited to locally by each foundation school and the UKFPO is not involved.

    Back to questions

  2. Is F2 structured differently to F1?

    Like F1, your F2 rotation will typically consist of three four-month placements.Foundation doctors are expected to revisit the same areas of practice in F2 as for F1 but take on increasing responsibility for patient care. The outcomes for F2 include those for F1 to indicate that foundation doctors are building on previous experience and practising at a more sophisticated and increasingly independent level. Please see the Curriculum for details.

    Back to questions

  3. How are placements allocated in my F2 year?

    Some foundation schools allocate successful applicants to two-year placements are known at the beginning of foundation training. Other schools will allocate only the F1 year initially, with a process for allocation to F2 guaranteeing that the successful applicant will be allocated to a F2 rotation, subject to progression. Each foundation school must publish details about the process used to match to either F1 or two-year programmes, prior to the opening of the Foundation Programme national application process.

    Back to questions

  4. Am I allowed to undertake F2 abroad?

    If you wish to do this, you must discuss it with your foundation school during F1 as there is considerable variation across foundation schools. See the FP Reference Guide (2012) (Paras 12.21-12.23) for more details.

    Back to questions

provisionally-registered/04 Application Process


  1. How do I apply to the Foundation Programme?

    Entry to the Foundation Programme is via a competitive application process.

    Before you can participate in the application process, you must ensure that you are eligible to apply. Information regarding the eligibility process for FP/AFP 2017 is available under the ''How to Apply/Eligibility'' section of the website.

    If you are currently studying at a UK Medical School, they can provide you with the relevant information and will be responsible for nominating you for the application process.

    All applicants must complete an online application in the autumn for the Foundation Programme commencing the following year.

    Back to questions

  2. Where can I find more information about the national application process?

    The FP/AFP 2017 Applicant's Handbook is available to download via the How to Apply section of this website. This provides useful information on the application process for the Foundation Programme and the Academic Foundation Programme along with advice on the selection methods, i.e. the Educational Performance Measure (EPM) and the SJT (selection assessment for FP 2017). It also includes the application timeline for the Foundation Programme commencing in August 2017 and other useful information. You may also find it useful to download the Application Presentation .

    Back to questions

  3. What is a unit of application (UoA)?

    A unit of application (UoA) is a group of one or more foundation schools that have joined together for the purposes of processing applications. The groupings for processing applications to the Academic Foundation Programme (AFP) are different and these are referred to as academic units of application (AUoA).

    Back to questions

  4. How is my application scored?

    Your overall application score will consist of your Educational Performance Measure (EPM) score (decile score plus educational achievements score) and the score you achieve for the SJT (selection assessment for FP 2017). More information about scores is available in the FP/AFP 2017 Applicant's Handbook .

    If you are applying for an Academic Foundation Programme (AFP), the score that is used to determine whether or not you receive an offer comprises your EPM score plus a score determined by the local AUoA. However, all AFP offers are subject to a satisfactory SJT score (i.e. you are not withdrawn from the process for an exceptionally low SJT score).

    Back to questions

  5. What is the Educational Performance Measure?

    The EPM is a measure of clinical and non-clinical skills, knowledge and performance up to the point of application. The EPM comprises two elements: medical school performance to date in deciles for which 34-43 points are available; and educational achievements recorded on your application form worth up to 7 points. A maximum of 50 points is available.

    Click here to read the EPM frequently asked questions.

    Back to questions

  6. The decile score I can see when I log in to my Oriel account is different to the one my medical school gave me. What should I do?

    If your EPM decile score is different to the one you were told by your medical school then you need to contact your medical school as soon as possible to clarify this. If you applied through the UKFPO Eligibility Office, you should contact the Eligibility Office. Changes to the decile score cannot be made after 16 December 2016.

    Back to questions

  7. What is the SJT (selection assessment for FP 2017)?

    The SJT (selection assessment for FP 2017) is an invigilated test designed to test the aptitudes expected of you as a foundation doctor and is used as a measure of meeting the national FP person specification . The SJT is taken under exam conditions and consists of 70 questions in 2 hours 20 minutes. It contains two question formats: rank five possible responses in order and select the three most appropriate responses. A maximum of 50 points is available. To learn more about the SJT please read the SJT FAQs.

    Back to questions

  8. When will I have to take the SJT (selection assessment for FP 2017)

    All applicants to the Foundation Programme and the Academic Foundation Programme (including military applicants) commencing in August 2017 are required to take the SJT in the UK on either:

    • 02 December 2016
    • 09 January 2017

    Your UK medical school or the UKFPO Eligibility Office will inform you of the date/s available to you. More information on the SJT is available on the UKFPO and ISFP websites .

    Back to questions

  9. Why is the SJT scored on a scale of 0-50 whilst the EPM is only 34-50?

    The relative weighting of the SJT and EPM, despite appearances, is 50:50. This relates to the distributions of scores from applicants between these measures. Please see appendix 3 of the Applicant's Handbook for more details.

    Back to questions

  10. How can one 2 hour 20 minutes exam be worth the same numberof points as 5/6 years at medical school?

    The SJT is a test of aptitudes and attributes required of an F1 Doctor. Although academic knowledge and clinical skill (as measured in the EPM) are clearly important, character attributes (as measured by the SJT) are also very relevant to your success as a Foundation Doctor. Please see appendix 3 of the Applicant's Handbook for more details.

    Back to questions

  11. How do you know the SJT is a valid test (i.e. measures the attributes it is supposed to)?

    Face validity and content validity of the SJT is achieved through subject matter expert (SME) involvement in test development, and mapping the SJT to the professional attributes derived from the FY1 Job Analysis and outlined in the person specification.

    The SJT has only been used for selection to the Foundation Programme since 2013 and so long term predictive validity is not yet possible to demonstrate, however an early validation study which followed a group of FP 2013 applicants into their first year as a Foundation Doctor, found that the SJT and the EPM were both predictors of future performance within FY1. The study found that the SJT is best able to predict future performance within low scoring applicants on the overall application score, whereas the EPM is best able to predict performance within high scoring applicants. This suggests that the two measures (SJT and EPM) are complementary in predicting FY1 performance.

    Academic studies of the validity SJT used in other contexts, including in GP recruitment, which was taken into account when introducing the SJT for selection to the Foundation Programme. Please refer to the SJT monograph for more details and full references.

    Back to questions

  12. Can I link my application to another applicant?

    Yes you can link your application to another person applying to the Foundation Programme (except military applicants), and you cannot link to someone applying to specialty or other medical training programme. Linking your applications will only guarantee you are allocated to the same UoA but not the same programme, employer or town.

    Please see the FP/AFP 2017 Applicant's Handbook for full details on linking your application.

    Back to questions

  13. If I have a criminal conviction (which I must declare on my application form), what do I do?

    The GMC must investigate all criminal convictions to ascertain whether you are fit to practise as a doctor. This can take several months. Therefore, it would be best for you to contact the GMC as soon as possible so they can start their investigations. If you are successful in obtaining a post and do not give the GMC sufficient notice, it may hold up your employment contract and therefore the start of your training programme.

    Back to questions

  14. How do UoA preferences work when it comes to allocating FP applicants to places?

    Applicants are required to rank all units of application (UoAs) in order of preference. Applicants will be allocated to units of application (UoAs) in score order using their total application score, (Educational Performance Measure score (EPM) plus SJT score), starting with the highest scoring applicant.

    Each applicant will be allocated to their highest preference UoA with a place available when it is their turn to be allocated. If their first choice is not available, the system will look at their second choice, and so on down their list of preferences until it finds their highest preference which still has a space available. Where applicants have the same score, the system will randomly select the order for allocation of applicants with that score.

    Back to questions

  15. What happens if there are not enough applicants for the number of vacancies available?

    If there are significantly fewer applicants than vacancies (under-subscription), some posts will be suspended in each foundation school in England using a pre-determined percentage. Posts will not be suspended in Wales, Northern Ireland and Scotland. This ensures a consistent fill rate across the country so that patient care can be delivered in all areas.

    Back to questions

  16. What happens if there are not enough foundation training jobs for everyone who applies?

    Over the last few years, there have been more fully eligible applicants than vacancies across the UK (oversubscription) at the point of allocation to Units of Application, and this is expected to continue. When the programme is oversubscribed, applications from individuals who cannot provide evidence of their right to work in the UK by the given deadline will not be considered.

    To date all fully eligible applicants have been allocated by the start of the programme in August, as there are usually around 200 vacancies which arise between March and the August start date; however the UKFPO cannot guarantee this will always happen.

    If, at the end of the FP offers process, there are more fully eligible applicants than FP places, allocation to a UoA becomes a three stage process:

    1. The 'n' top scoring applicants will be placed on the primary list, where 'n' is the total number of vacancies available across the UK.
    2. These applicants will be allocated to a UoA in score order on 09 March 2016.
    3. The remaining applicants are placed on a reserve list, to be allocated in batches on three predetermined dates (May, June, July).

    Back to questions

  17. Is it possible for me to be allocated to my first choice unit of application (UoA) if I?m on the reserve list?

    Yes, there is a possibility that you could be allocated to your first choice UoA but this will only happen if there are spaces available in that UoA when it is your turn to be allocated. However, you will have much less choice in which programme you are matched to within that school once you are allocated. You will have to accept posts that are available rather than list your preferences from the full range of programmes.

    Back to questions

  18. What happens if not enough vacancies arise for all applicants on the reserve list?

    To date, all eligible applicants have secured a Foundation Programme post by the start date, including all applicants on the reserve list. However we cannot guarantee this in any given year. Any applicants who have not been allocated after the final reserve list batch allocation will be referred back to their medical school. Medical schools will then explore local opportunities for graduates to complete a year's training at F1 level.

    The number of vacancies that arise after the primary list allocation will depend on the number of applicants who withdraw from the process after they have been allocated. Applicants withdraw for a variety of reasons such as failing their final exams, failing PLAB or other personal reasons.

    Back to questions

  19. Can I appeal against the outcome of my application?

    There is an appeals process in place where an applicant can appeal against the outcome of the application process on the following grounds:

    • A service interruption through the UKFPO's application website (Oriel) may have disadvantaged you; or
    • The process was not applied with appropriate diligence or due care; or
    • There is evidence of prejudice, bias or conflict of interest during the recruitment process.

    You cannot appeal against your score and no feedback is provided on individual applications. The Application Appeals process has been published on our website and is available by following this link: The Foundation Programme - Key documents .

    Back to questions

  20. What happens if I do not wish to accept the post?

    Successful applicants will be allocated to one unit of application (UoA) only, and then matched to one programme only. Declining your allocated UoA or matched programme will mean you are withdrawing from the application process. There is no system to swap between UoAs or individual foundation schools. If you withdraw from the process, you will be unable to apply to the two year Foundation Programme until the following year. Vacancies that arise after the end of the national application process are normally service posts, for which doctors must have full GMC registration.

    Back to questions

  21. I?ve been allocated to a foundation programme which was not my first choice. Can I continue working in this programme whilst re-applying for next year?

    No. If you no longer wish to continue in your current foundation programme, you must withdraw from the process before reapplying the following year.

    Back to questions

  22. Due to a change in my circumstances, I may not be able to take up my post in my allocated foundation school. What can I do?

    If your circumstances have changed since you applied to the Foundation Programme but you are still able to undertake foundation training, you could consider whether or not you meet the criteria for an inter-foundation school transfer (IFST). Any IFST has to initially be considered and approved by the foundation school you have been allocated to before it can be considered by the foundation school you wish to transfer to. Any IFST would also be dependent on a vacancy being available in the school you wish to transfer to. Refer to the IFST guidance for full information on this process.

    If you are no longer able to undertake foundation training, you should contact your allocated UoA and withdraw from the process. You will be able to apply again next year if you are then in a position to start foundation training.

    Back to questions

  23. What is the process for providing references for the Foundation Programme?

    Applicants are required to provide names and contact details of two referees as part of their online application. The applicant must ensure that the referees are happy to provide a reference before nominating them. The applicant is also required to ensure that the email address provided for each referee is accessed regularly and the referee is aware of which email address has been used.

    The dates for the reference period are available in the FP/AFP 2017 Applicant's Handbook References are not used in the scoring or allocation process. They will have no bearing on your application and are used only by your employer as part of pre-employment checks

    Back to questions

  24. How do I know if a reference has been submitted?

    In order to check whether online references have been received, log in to your Oriel account and select "Submitted References" from the right-hand menu. This section will show you whether or not your references have been submitted. If a reference has been submitted, you will be able to view the content.

    Back to questions

  25. What if my referee does not provide a reference by the deadline?

    Please keep in mind that you are responsible for ensuring that two referees submit references for you before you start the Foundation Programme. A contract of employment will not be issued until these references are in place. If either or both of your referees is unable to submit an online structured reference by the deadline then your employing healthcare organisation will work with you to ensure appropriate references are submitted. This will not affect the way that your application is processed. The UKFPO cannot accept references via email, post or fax.

    Back to questions

  26. Can I change my referees?

    You can change your referee details online at any point up until the deadline for submission of references (see the FP/AFP 2017 Applicant's Handbook ), or until a reference is submitted ? whichever comes first. Once a reference is submitted, it cannot be changed and you cannot request a different reference.

    If you change the details of a nominated referee after they have received an email asking them to provide a reference for you, the system will automatically send a reference request email to the new email address. This will occur each time a referee's email address is changed (the system effectively believes that a new referee has been nominated).

    Back to questions

  27. Can an ST3 act as my referee?

    No, because they are still a trainee. Referees must be associate specialist or consultant level.

    Back to questions

  28. What is the difference between date of qualification and date of graduation?

    The date of qualification is the date on which a University Board agrees the results and issues a pass list, then notifies students of the result. The date of graduation is the date of the award ceremony.

    Some medical schools have a period of many months between the date of qualification and the date of graduation, so the date of graduation is not a reliable indicator of when the applicant passed their degree and how up to date their clinical knowledge and skills may be.

    The relevant date for our application process is when an applicant passed their qualification, not when they graduated. If you are still unsure, we recommend that you speak with your medical school for further guidance.

    Back to questions

  29. What happens if I do not pass my final exams and graduate as expected?

    You will be withdrawn from the application process and will have to re-apply the following year. The post you were allocated to you will not be held; you will have to re-apply in open competition the following year.

    Back to questions

  30. I applied last year but my application was withdrawn. Do I have to sit the SJT again?

    Yes you will be required to take the SJT again as part of your FP 2017 application.

    Back to questions

  31. My GMC number on my application is wrong. How can I amend it?

    Your GMC number will be pre-populated in the personal details section of your Oriel account. If your GMC number is incorrect you can update this yourself before you submit your application. However, if you do not notice any discrepancies in your GMC number until after you have submitted your application form, you will need to contact your local foundation school to request for it to be amended.

    Back to questions

  32. How do I apply for an F2 post?

    If you successfully apply for the two-year integrated Foundation Programme, you will be allocated to an F2 post in one of two ways. Some foundation schools match applicants to a two-year rotation at the outset, while others allow you to express your preference for an F2 rotation during your F1 year.

    If you have full GMC registration or wish to change foundation schools on completion of your F1 year, you can apply for a standalone one-year F2 post. Each foundation school recruits for one-year stand-alone F2 posts at a local level and the UK Foundation Programme Office is not involved in this. Each foundation school will have their own timetable and their own deadline for receiving applications. The UKFPO has recently published a framework and person specification for recruitment to one-year stand-alone F2 programmes. Please go to http://www.foundationprogramme.nhs.uk/pages/home/how-to-apply/F2-LATs where you will find this document along with links to the foundation school F2 recruitment pages. Vacancies will also be advertised on NHS Jobs.

    Back to questions

  33. Can I apply to specialty training?

    To be eligible to apply for specialty training you must meet all essential criteria of the relevant person specification, including full GMC registration with a licence to practise and evidence of having achieved foundation competence (as defined by the outcomes of the FP Curriculum).

    More information on applying to specialty training can be found on the national Specialty Recruitment website or individual deanery websites.

    Back to questions

  34. I applied last year but withdrew my application. I want to re-apply for FP 2017 ? will my log in details be the same?

    No, you will need to register for a new Oriel account for the FP 2017 application round.

    Back to questions

Del.icio.us Digg Reddit Facebook Stumble Upon Follow UKFPO on Twitter